Wednesday, August 1, 2018

IWSG 27- Adrift In Query-land


It's August. And the first Wednesday of the month actually fell on the first, not sure how many times that's happened before. Either way, that means it's IWSG blog hop day!

If you've been keeping up with my posts this year, you know I've ventured into what I call Query-land.  When I started this process it was going to be a 'just for the experience' sort of deal, and for the most part it still is, but feelings are changing the longer I'm dealing with that side of the business.

Why? Well the waiting. The waiting for responses is enough to drive a person insane. Especially if you're like me and patience isn't your strong suit.

Now my support group all advise to 'set it and forget it' (yes a slogan from a late night infomercial) but that's easier said than done. Mostly because the way to 'forget it' is by writing and working on other things while you await what could possibly be the dreaded R.

In my case, it's a tad harder because as I discussed back in June's post, I've not been in the mood to write. Because of that I have way more time to obsessively refresh my email or submittable page hoping for some word, one way or another.

But some good has come of this adventure. As discussed last month, I did receive my first rejection, quickly followed by a second. The first however was nice, and detailed and for that I was thankful. So much so, that when I attended the RWA (Romance Writers of America) conference a few weeks ago, I waited in line to talk to the editor that rejected me to thank her. And let me tell ya, I could see from the look on her face that being thanked for a rejection doesn't happen often. LOL But I wanted to let her know how much I appreciated the fact that she took the time to write out what didn't work for her. It was a pleasant conversation, and left an opening for future possible submissions to her.

I also got to have lunch with editors from another publisher thanks to a Twitter contest I won. No talking shop, just hanging out and having drinks, and relaxing after a busy few days at the conference.

The building of relationships. I probably would have never had these chances if I hadn't set off down this path. I've given myself til the end of the year. I'll keep querying, putting myself out there, and try my hardest not to think of the waiting involved.

This month's optional question: What pitfalls would you warn other writers to avoid on their publication journey?

~Don't compare yourself to others. Your journey will be different from theirs. As a slow writer, this was hard for me. I often felt like I was doing it 'wrong' or not cut out for things because I wasn't producing fast enough. As writers we face enough obstacles along the way, and we (or I do) get in our own way a lot of the time. By not playing the comparison game, it's one less thing to mess with your head as you make your way in this business. 

The Insecure Writer’s Support Group is a home for writers in all stages; from unpublished to bestsellers. Our goal is to offer assistance and guidance. We want to help writers overcome their insecurities, and by offering encouragement we are creating a community of support.

The awesome co-hosts for the August 1 posting of the IWSG are Erika Beebe, Sandra Hoover, Susan Gourley, and Lee Lowery!

Until next time
~Meka

16 comments:

  1. That is really nice that the editor gave feedback. Every rejection puts you closer to a positive response, right? Best of luck in query land!

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    1. It was very nice and extremely helpful. I'm not sure how much longer I'll stay in query land, but I have enjoyed my visit.

      thanks for stopping by

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  2. You probably made that editor's day. I bet she remembers you for a very long time. Rejections suck, but each one is closer to an acceptance.

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    1. LOL yeah, she was surprised, but it was a very nice conversation. And I've hired her to edit my indie work because she does do freelance. :) Rejections do suck, even when you go into the query expecting the rejection to come.

      thanks for stopping by

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  3. I agree with not comparing anyone to anyone or anything. It makes me think of apples and bananas. Both lovely and still so different. They both have a place in my kitchen though. ;-)

    Anna from elements of emaginette

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    1. You are very true! I won't write like someone else and they won't write like me. Our journeys are different, but both valid.

      thanks for stopping by

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  4. I'm so happy you spoke to the editor who gave you feedback and shared this story with us. It really helps to personalize the whole query experience, which can seem so impersonal at times. You're on the right track! Keep going! http://www.raimeygallant.com

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    1. I was happy she was at the event and I got to meet her in person. The query experience is much different from doing indie. I'm lucky to have a support group to help me through otherwise I'm not sure I'd survive.

      thanks for stopping by

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  5. Oh I understand about the waiting. I hate the waiting. Glad to hear that a past rejection might lead to a possible future acceptance.

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    1. The waiting is the worst! Things have changed with that editor, she's no longer with that publishing house, but I did reach out to her because she does freelance and I'm in the market for an editor.

      thanks for stopping by

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  6. I have problems with patience. I would really like to have some, but seriously, it takes so long to build up! I hope you find a home for story!

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    1. hahaha yes! The waiting is KILLING ME. I don't have the stamina to do the query thing long term. I like getting it out there, and done instead of the weeks/months it can take to get a response. I would love for someone to love it, but if not, it'll join my other two that I self pubbed.

      thanks for stopping by

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  7. So true. You have to go at your own pace and NOT compare. Isn't it unfortunate there's only one way to obtain patience?

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    1. Yup. I'm slow, I have accepted that and can't beat myself up over the fact I'm not producing multiple books a year like some around me. It's not how I roll. Yes, you'd think after 4 kids, I'd have more patience, but sadly that is not the case. LOL

      thanks for stopping by

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  8. That is so awesome that you took the time to thank that editor! You just told her that the time she takes providing personalized rejections is appreciated, so she's more apt to continue. Now so many give form rejections or none at all because of defensive jerk writers. You did such a good thing, not only for her and you, but for other authors who will query that editor.

    And yes, in this industry as in all others, building relationships is key. It's a bit surprising how many writers don't get that and instead just advertise and pimp their work constantly. If people like you, they'll help you.

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    1. Yes. It really is the little things that matter, and for my first rejection, for it to not be a 'form' got me off to a good start (if that makes sense). The others I've gotten have been form, but still nicely worded.

      Agreed. I have such a hard time talking about my own work and trying to advertise it. I rarely do it because I don't want to be seen as 'that person' the one that is always shouting buy my book. I'm way more likely to like, re-tweet, share, etc the links for others first.

      thanks for stopping by

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